April 18, 2007

ben-vaccine

Ben had already experienced the jabs prior to ones he received on April 18th. He had quite a few, as do most children by the time they are a year old.

We had just finished his birthday celebration and I had traveled out of town on business when Ben and his mom went in for the shots.

Erica and I had talked about this day, I wouldn’t say we were scared, more like we were cautious. We had no idea about autism, but we knew vaccines were potentially dangerous to some children. Every parent hears horror stories and we had heard enough to be cautious. Erica went in with Ben, asked to speak to the doctor and the doctor gave her a good five minutes of his time to comfort all fears and anxieties. His words soothed Erica’s concerns and she signed the release allowing Ben to be injected with an MMRV, HepA, HIB and Prevnar, seven total vaccines.

They took some of Ben’s blood and his Hgb was at 13.3, (normal 10.5 – 13.0) his WBC was 6.2 (normal 6 – 15), his HCT was 40.1 (normal is 33-39). It looked to them like Ben was healthy enough to deal with the viruses his body will be required to fight with in order to build a immunity. Otherwise why would they have injected him?

Of course Ben screamed, he cried, he cried so much he vomited, he was upset for hours. Erica recalls this part of it in her journal.

Daddy left for a job and to help grandmammy and papa move into their house. You had just gotten your shots and we were on the floor in your bedroom and you were crying, wouldn’t stop, you’d been that way most of the time near the end of our day.   just picked you up and held you sitting on the floor and I asked you what’s wrong, still breathing hard, sucking your thumb, tears down your face. I said, “what’s wrong, use your words, tell me what”  You took your thumb out and pulled backwards looking at me you said, “me mesee daddy” put your thumb back in your mouth and placed your head down on my chest. You wanted to see daddy. I showed you his picture in the hallway and called him. You seemed better after that so we went to dinner. You are fabulous.

“Me Mesee daddy”, the last sentence he would say for nearly a year.

Things sort of started rolling downhill from there, little by little Mister Ben-gee-man started eroding into a different little boy. A week or so after this we babysat my nephew who is a month older than Ben. Ben immediately started acting out in violent and aggressive ways we hadn’t seen before.

It took 5 months before the seriousness of his developmental backslide became important enough to talk to the doctor about it. We made all kinds of excuses and just thought he would work out of it on his own.  When we did go in the doctors basically said he seemed to them a healthy little boy. They viewed my wife a little differently, “very preoccupied with Ben’s behavior” ,”mother overly concerned about his speech development” ,”concerned he is not responding to his name but upon evaluation he seems to hear quite normally”, “difficult to address all of mom’s concerns”, “appears to exhibit age appropriate behavior, a little on the hyperactive side”, ” prescribed amoxicillin”

Also in Ben’s chart is these notes from the doctor on Ben’s 9 month well visit:

Development: feeds self, sits without support, crawls, pincer grasps, vision/hearing normal per parents, knows name, gets to sitting, laughs, imitates speech and “Lots of words, “L” sounds, names shapes and colors!”

On March 6, 2007 (11 months) Erica made a note in Ben’s baby journal that said:

Points and says, “I see it” a lot.

Most of those observations of Ben’s development are true today, 24 months later, but not 6, 10 or 12 months later. Ben has just begun pointing once again and he still can’t say the “L” sound also he has just started imitating, in a call and response kind of way, once again.

In this video Ben is imitating Erica. He was 10 months old, 26 months later he can’t do it. Or won’t. Who knows.

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One response to “April 18, 2007

  1. Birth to 2 months: Vaccine recommended

    * Hepatitis B

    The first dose of hepatitis B vaccine is given at birth. A second dose is given at least one month after the first dose.

    2 months: Vaccines recommended

    * Rotavirus vaccine
    * Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)
    * Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
    * Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
    * Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)

    At age 2 months, your child begins a series of several vaccinations. To reduce the number of shots, your child’s doctor may suggest combination vaccines. Although catch-up vaccines are generally available, it’s important to follow the vaccines schedule as closely as possible. The first dose of the rotavirus vaccine can’t be given before age 6 weeks, for example, and the rotavirus vaccine series can’t be started after age 15 weeks.

    4 months: Vaccines recommended

    * Rotavirus vaccine
    * Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)
    * Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
    * Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
    * Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)

    At age 4 months, your child receives follow-up doses to those vaccines received at age 2 months.

    6 months: Vaccines recommended

    * Rotavirus vaccine
    * Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)
    * Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
    * Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)

    At age 6 months, your child receives another round of the vaccines given at 2 months and 4 months, with the exception of the polio vaccine. A third dose of polio vaccine comes later in the vaccines schedule.

    6 to 18 months: Vaccines recommended

    * Hepatitis B
    * Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)

    Your child receives the final dose of the hepatitis B vaccine between ages 6 months and 18 months. Your child’s doctor may recommend giving the polio vaccine at age 9 months to reduce the number of shots given at age 6 months.

    6 to 59 months: Vaccine recommended

    * Influenza

    A yearly influenza vaccine, preferably given in the fall, helps protect your child from the flu. The first time your child is vaccinated for the flu, he or she will need two doses of the vaccine spaced one month apart. In the following years, only one dose of the vaccine is needed. For younger children, the flu vaccine is given as a shot. For otherwise healthy children age 2 or older, the vaccine may be given as a nasal spray.

    12 to 15 months: Vaccines recommended

    * Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
    * Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
    * Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR)
    * Chickenpox (varicella)

    The final doses of both Hib and PCV vaccines must wait until your child is age 12 months or older. The first doses of MMR and varicella vaccines also are given at this time. To avoid giving four shots in one visit, your child’s doctor may recommend the MMR and varicella vaccines at age 12 months and the Hib and PCV vaccines at age 15 months. It’s also common to combine the MMR and varicella vaccines in a single shot.

    12 to 23 months: Vaccine recommended

    * Hepatitis A

    Your child receives two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine between ages 12 and 23 months, spaced at least six months apart.

    15 to 18 months: Vaccine recommended

    * Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)

    Your child receives the fourth dose of DTaP between ages 15 months and 18 months. In some cases, the fourth dose can be given as early as age 12 months — as long as it’s been six months since the last dose.

    2 to 6 years: Vaccines recommended

    * Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PPV)
    * Hepatitis A
    * Meningococcal (MCV4)

    Children in high-risk groups may need an additional dose of pneumococcal vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine or one dose of meningococcal vaccine between ages 2 and 6. Ask your child’s doctor if your child needs these vaccines.

    4 to 6 years: Vaccines recommended

    * Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)
    * Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)
    * Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR)
    * Chickenpox (varicella)

    About the time your child starts kindergarten, he or she receives the final doses of DTaP, IPV, MMR and varicella vaccines. Many states require proof of current vaccinations before allowing school enrollment.

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